Chatham County Phillips Families

From ENC Phillips Group Wiki

Chatham County, North Carolina was formed from Orange County in 1770.

History

Some of the first European settlers of what would become the county were English Quakers, who settled along the Haw and Eno rivers.[1] The county was formed in 1771 from Orange County. It was named in 1758 for William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, who served as British Prime Minister from 1766 to 1768 and opposed harsh colonial policies. In 1907, parts of Chatham County and Moore County were combined to form Lee County.

The award-winning PBS documentary, Family Name, notes Chatham County as the place where men of the Alston family fathered children with African-American slaves, leading to Alston descendants who were African American, as well as European-American branches of the family.[2][3]

George Moses Horton, Historic Poet Laureate of Chatham County, (1797?-1883) lived most of his life in Chatham County and is among the few slaves to have published material while still a slave.[4][5][6]

Moncure once served as the westernmost inland port in the state, as steamships could travel between it and the coast.[7]

On March 25, 2010, the Chatham County Courthouse, built in 1881, caught fire while undergoing renovations. It has now been rebuilt. For more information, see Pittsboro, North Carolina.

Phillips Families

Through DNA testing, some of Phillips DNA Family Group 10 can be traced back to Chatham County.

Phillips DNA Group 10

References

  1. Bishir, Catherine (2005). North Carolina Architecture. UNC Press. p. 38. https://books.google.com/books?id=NccTgQkmPIEC. 
  2. "UNC-TV ONLINE: Black Issues Forum:Transcripts". Unctv.org. http://www.unctv.org/bif/transcripts/1997/bif1211.html. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  3. Macky Alston (1998-09-15). "Family Name | POV". PBS. http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov1998/familyname/about/about2.html. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  4. "George Moses Horton, 1798?-ca.1880". Docsouth.unc.edu. http://docsouth.unc.edu/fpn/hortonlife/bio.html. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  5. Hudson, Marjorie (1999-02-22). "The George Moses Horton Project: Celebrating a triumph of literacy". Learnnc.org. http://www.learnnc.org/articles/horton0403-1. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  6. "George Moses Horton Project". Chathamarts.org. 2000-11-18. http://www.chathamarts.org/horton/. Retrieved 2012-06-28. 
  7. "Chatham County : Interesting Facts & Tidbits". Chathamnc.org. 2007-07-31. http://www.chathamnc.org/Index.aspx?page=29. Retrieved 2012-06-28.